Legal Resources

  • Washington Law Help – Packets and overviews are available on this site. Here’s how they describe themselves: “Washington LawHelp is a guide to free civil legal services for low-income persons and seniors in Washington.  This site provides legal education materials and tools that give you basic information on a number of legal problems, and in some cases, detailed instructions and forms to help you represent yourself in court.”
  • Washington State Courts – If you are going to try representing yourself, this website is crucial. Make sure to read the rules, state and local. Washington State court forms are also available on this website.
  • ACLU of Washington – The folks at the ACLU are great and can help with some issues. Their primary focus is impact litigation (taking on cases where the impact will be bigger than the individuals involved). But they also have great publications and resources.
  • Legal Voice – The folks at Legal Voice are great. They do a combination of policy, impact litigation, and providing of resources. Here’s how they describe themselves: Legal Voice secures and protects women’s legal rights. Our drive for justice improves the lives of mothers, daughters, aunts, sisters, nieces & grandmothers in our region. A vital, active force in the community, we make substantive, lasting changes through legislation, self-help resources and litigation with a far-reaching public impact.
  • Northwest Justice Project (NJP) – NJP describes itself as follows: “NJP is Washington’s publicly funded statewide legal aid program for low income persons and groups in Washington. Through its seventeen offices and CLEAR, Washington’s centralized intake, advice and referral hotline, NJP provides free legal information, advice, limited assistance, representation, community education, outreach and other community based advocacy.”
  • QLaw Foundation – The Qlaw Foundation does panels and a GLBT Legal Clinic in connection with the King County Bar Association. The GLBT Legal Clinic is one of many specialty clinics of the King County Bar Association Neighborhood Legal Clinic Program where people can have a half an hour to an hour with an attorney to ask legal questions and get guidance on their legal issues.
  • U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights – This agency is responsible for enforcing Title IX. Complaints can be filed through the OCR. They also have resources available for schools and limited resources for students.
  • Team Child – Team Child is a great organization and is one of the many resources available in Washington to help support low-income youth. Here’s how they describe themselves: “TeamChild staff attorneys provide legal representation and advice to help youth assert their right to services that meet their basic needs. Our attorneys work directly with youth to identify their goals and create a plan to achieve those goals. For example, we help children get back into school, find safe and stable housing, get healthcare and mental health services, and access other public support.  Legal representation from TeamChild is effective in reducing juvenile court involvement and improving access to education, healthcare, and housing.”
  • Washington State Bar Association (WSBA)- The WSBA has a variety of programs. In addition, if you are looking for an attorney in your area, you can search for an attorney in the Lawyer Directory and filter by Practice Area and City.
  • Washington State Attorney General Wing Luke Office of Civil Rights

Non Legal Resources

  • GLSEN – Gay, Lesbian, & Straight Education Network – GLESN is a national education organization focused on ensuring safe schools for all students. They do research, provide resources, have safe space kits, and empower students. Washington State has a GLSEN chapter that provides workshops throughout the state.
  • King County Trans Resource & Referral Guide – Updated in 2017, this guide is an “updated, comprehensive community tool for trans and gender nonconforming individuals, their families and local health and human service providers.” The guide was created by an all-trans work group. Disponible en español.
  • Safe Schools Coalition – Safe Schools Coalition started in Washington State and has been replicated throughout many states and internationally. It is a coalition of organizations that support. It provides resources, reports, and political advocacy. Resources are also available in Spanish.
  • Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs (WCSAP) – WSCAP is a place to turn for dealing with the emotional components of sexual assault. They have resources and information about a variety of programs. WSCAP describes itself as:  “a non-profit organization that strives to unite agencies engaged in the elimination of sexual violence. WCSAP provides information, training and expertise to program and individual members who support victims, family and friends, the general public, and all those whose lives have been affected by sexual assault.”
  • Washington State Office of the Education Ombuds (OEO) – resolves complaints, disputes, and problems between families and Washington State elementary and secondary public schools. The intervene in issues such as: bullying/harassment, cyber bullying, suspensions, expulsions, special education, enrollment, transportation, discipline, acadmic progress, truancy, transition from pre-school to Kindergarten.
  • Washington State Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction – Safety Center  – The OSPI safety center provides resources to schools an parents on a variety of topics, including bullying and harassment.
  • OSPI also has a list of NonPublic Agencies (NPA) that districts can contract with when they are unable to meet a student’s special education needs. There are hyperlinks to the NPAs and it’s a great place to begin to research possible options.
  • The ARC of Washington State
  • NAACP
  • Disability Rights Washington
  • Centro De La Raza
  • Washington Autism Alliance and Advocacy
  • Playgarden